clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

John Lewis calls for Americans to “redeem the soul of America” in posthumous essay

“While my time here has now come to an end, I want you to know that in the last days and hours of my life you inspired me,” he wrote.

John Lewis Getty Images

On Thursday (July 30), Congressman and civil rights leader John Lewis was laid to rest at the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church. The morning of his funeral, the New York Times published an essay that he wrote a few days before his untimely death.

“While my time here has now come to an end, I want you to know that in the last days and hours of my life you inspired me,” he wrote. “You filled me with hope about the next chapter of the great American story when you used your power to make a difference in our society. Millions of people motivated simply by human compassion laid down the burdens of division. Around the country and the world you set aside race, class, age, language and nationality to demand respect for human dignity.”

He continued, “Emmett Till was my George Floyd. He was my Rayshard Brooks, Sandra Bland and Breonna Taylor. He was 14 when he was killed and I was only 15 years old at the time. I will never ever forget the moment when it became so clear that he could easily have been me. In those days, fear constrained us like an imaginary prison, and troubling thoughts of potential brutality committed for no understandable reason were the bars.”

Lewis also spoke to the American people about what they can do to “redeem the soul of America” by getting into what he called “good trouble, necessary trouble.”

Voting and participating in the democratic process are key,” he wrote. “The vote is the most powerful nonviolent change agent you have in a democratic society. You must use it because it is not guaranteed. You can lose it.”

He continued, “You must also study and learn the lessons of history because humanity has been involved in this soul-wrenching, existential struggle for a very long time. People on every continent have stood in your shoes, though decades and centuries before you. The truth does not change and that is why the answers worked out long ago can help you find solutions to the challenges of our time. Continue to build union between movements stretching across the globe because we must put away our willingness to profit from the exploitation of others.”

“When historians pick up their pens to write the story of the 21st century, let them say that it was your generation who laid down the heavy burdens of hate at last and that peace finally triumphed over violence, aggression and war. So I say to you, walk with the wind, brothers and sisters, and let the spirit of peace and the power of everlasting love be your guide,” Lewis concluded.

Rest in peace Congressman John Lewis.

Sign up for the newsletter Join the revolution.

Get REVOLT updates weekly so you don’t miss a thing.