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Master P connects with former Tesla engineer to make Black-owned supercars

The No Limit Records founder is getting into the automotive industry by creating his own supercar.

Master P Paras Griffin/Getty Images

Master P is a true jack of all trades. After taking on a slew of business ventures over the years, the No Limit Records founder is destined to make history with his endeavor.

On Martin Luther King Day (Jan. 18), Master P uploaded a video to his Instagram account, in which he revealed his plans to create a Black-owned supercar. He recently partnered up with former Tesla engineer Richard Patterson to make the Trion Nemesis RR and the Nemesis GT. In the video, we can see an orange Nemesis RR in the background of Master P’s conversation with his son Romeo and Patterson.

“This is history,” Master P wrote in the caption. “We have come a long way to witness and be a part of innovative technology, manufacturing and producing vehicles owned and made by us. In addition to the Nemesis RR models, Trion Supercars is currently in the process of creating affordable luxury SUVs and cars for the masses.”

Master P, born Percy Miller, is all about making innovative moves to secure more income. Back in December, Forbes reported that the New Orleans native is interested in buying Reebok from adidas, which is preparing to sell the sneaker brand in March 2021.

“As we focus on turning Reebok into a lifestyle brand not just a basketball brand, our most important initiative will be to put money back into the community that built this company,” Miller said.

Prior to that, Master P had created his own substitutes for Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben’s after both brand logos were replaced last year. His food company, PJ Foods Company, launched “Uncle P’s Louisiana Seasoned,” which makes rice, beans, grits, pancake mix, syrup and oatmeal.

“When you look at Aunt Jemima, and you look at Uncle Ben, we don’t own those products, we never did,” he said. “We need to understand that we’re not going to be able to put money back in our [Black] community because we don’t own those brands. Our grandparents [have] been having us buy those products because they think it’s people that look like us.”

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