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Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg passes away at 87 from complications of cancer

She died in her Washington D.C. home surrounded by family and friends.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg SARAH SILBIGER/GETTY IMAGES

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has passed away at age 87 from complications of metastatic pancreas cancer, the court announced today (Sept. 18).

She reportedly died surrounded by her family at her home in Washington, D.C.

“Our Nation has lost a jurist of historic stature,” said Chief Justice John Roberts. “We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague. Today we mourn, but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her — a tireless and resolute champion of justice.”

Ginsburg, who was the most senior member of the court’s liberal wing, has been serving since she was appointed by former President Bill Clinton in 1993. Over the years, she’s made controversial statements and delivered votes in support of abortion rights, same-sex marriage, voting rights, immigration, health care and affirmative action. She ultimately earned the nickname “Notorious R.B.G.” from fans who enjoyed her larger than life personality, views of the law and intense arguments.

In recent years, she had fives stints of cancer, but a biopsy from the most recent recurrence revealed lesions on her liver. Despite the news, she remained optimistic as her chemotherapy was reportedly producing positive results.

Ginsburg was adamant about staying on the Supreme Court for as long as her health permitted.

“I have often said I would remain a member of the Court as long as I can do the job full steam,” she said in a statement in July 2020. “ I remain fully able to do that.”

She echoed similar sentiments during the Obama administration when liberals tried to get her to step down.

“Tell me who the president could have nominated this spring that you would rather see on the court than me?” she said at the time.

A private service for Ginsburg will be held at Arlington National Cemetery.

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