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Guapdad 4000 talks fun Dreamville sessions, “Gucci Pajamas,” his sound, career goals and more

REVOLT caught up with the star in the North Hollywood studio he frequents to discuss everything including “Gucci Pajamas,” his goals for himself, and more. See the convo here.

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Guapdad 4000 is the Ferragamo Falcon and someone who lives on Mount Scamlympus in the country of Scamdovia. The Bay Area native describes himself as “a gentle dictator, but a dictator nonetheless. I run my country with sovereignty and I use my diplomatic immunity as much as possible.”

On a serious note, the “Scammin’” rapper arrives as one of the most hilarious, wild, yet entertaining artists to ever grace the rap game with an out-of-this-world personality, and even more crazy antics. This year alone, the 27-year-old unleashed his “Flossin” music video in which he received head while standing in the car door of his Range Rover, lost a bet to Drake during the NBA Championships and had to dress up as a Raptor with a sign on the Bay Bridge in San Francisco; and even tapped Chance The Rapper and Charlie Wilson for his new single “Gucci Pajamas.”

When asked if he’s ever sick of being funny, he answers, “No because it gets me free stuff, bitches, and interviews with Shirley.” Guapdad has been linked with Sam Lancaster (TWNSHP management) for some time now, and his rap career has been on the rise each and every day since. A huge accomplishment under his belt include his contributions to the Dreamville sessions, which resulted in placements on three records on Revenge of The Dreamers III. In addition to the priceless moments and memories shared, Guap received his first plaque for the album going platinum.

His work ethic and party endeavors are a direct result of his upbringing in Oakland, which he describes as “the pain of the ghetto. It just speaks to me at all times, like a little ghost I hear in my ear. It whispers me sweet nothings.” Taking it all the way back to his hometown, Guap shut down the stage at Rolling Loud Bay Area in late summer and performed crowd favorites “First Things First” featuring G-Eazy, “Costa Rica” off ROTD3, “Prada Process” featuring 6lack, and more.

REVOLT caught up with the star in the North Hollywood studio he frequents to discuss everything including “Gucci Pajamas,” his goals for himself, and more. See the convo below.

How was Rolling Loud in your hometown of Oakland?

Crazzyyyy! That shit was ridiculous, man. We had like 10 mosh-pits. I’ve never had mosh-pits and I’ve never had CO2, when the stage blows the smoke out... So, it was super tight.

How’s your hometown love compared to elsewhere?

I’m actually poppin’ everywhere else but my hometown. Yeah, my hometown’s catching up.

How would you describe your sound?

I’m a bit more eclectic. My music ranges from however melodic I want it to be. The good thing about my sound is me, I’m the constant.

You’re so versatile. At what point were you like, ‘I can sing and rap’?

I started fucking around with autotune way before I got serious with music, so it’s been a long time coming. Years of trying to sing because I can’t, then learning how the program works and watching hella T-Pain tutorials. All these live things where he explains how autotune works and how you should do it, shit like that. The homie DTB was really helpful with that, too. Just understanding what’s going on with what my throat is doing and how the program is picking it up.

It feels like you’ve been in the music game for a minute. At what point did you realize this music thing was getting real?

I ain’t been in shit for a minute, I’m a baby. I recorded my first song a long time ago, but to say I’ve been in the game, it gives myself a plaque that I don’t feel I’ve earned yet. I’ve been working at music for awhile, yes. I recorded my first song in the 6th grade with my drummer teacher Mr. Cuevas. It was trash (chuckles). It was horrible.

Congrats on the Dreamville records going platinum! How’s it feel to receive your first plaque?

It feels amazing. I laughed about it. I cried about it. I celebrated it. It’s dope, like it’s funny. It was like a cocky laughter, like I told you!

Did you expect that to happen?

No, I mean as soon as I did the hook to ‘Costa Rica,’ J. Cole told me all of that. Everything. He’s just like, ‘It’s gonna be one.’ He’s like, ‘You got one, that’s it for you when it comes to the project.’ I’m just like, ‘Oh dope.’ I always set the bar low. I just wanted people to appreciate it and appreciate me. But, I didn’t know it was going to do that. That was fire.

Can you bring us back to that exact moment you made the chorus?

I’m super drunk... Buddy had some Jameson. Bas and I had just did another song with Pyrex. Pyrex played the beat and I instantly lit up in the room, I’m like, ‘This is tight as fuck!’ Bas had eight bars, he rapped his eight bars to his verse and I just came up with the hook right after that. Because I was looking at my Instagram and SoundCloud analytics, it tells you where n*ggas is at. I’m like, ‘Whoa! I got fans in Costa Rica.’ But, I sung it how I sung the hook. Then, it was over.

Best memory from the Dreamville recording sessions?

It was so much, man. One of the skits we recorded was a church skit with me and Buddy, Buddy was the pastor and I was Deacon Debit. Masego was there, he was doing some singing and shit. It was everybody. We were just making up church songs on the spot.

Are we going to hear any of them?

I don’t know what we doing ‘cause it was a church for smoking weed. I kept just talking about the collection plate (chuckles). Trying to pass around the collection plate while Buddy was singing about weed. J.I.D was there. He was doing little skits here and there, while Gr8 from EarthGang was popping in doing shit. It was funny as hell.

What’s your relationship with Buddy?

That’s like my best friend. One of my best friends. Us together is ridiculous. It’s cool, people say we’re the new fucking Redman and Method Man. Hip hop’s next dynamic duo, shit like that. But, that’s just my patna, man. We got so much music. We’re slowly working on an album.

Anything you learned from recording with him?

I learned a lot. I learned a lot from Buddy. His process in the studio is wild. His approach to melody is great, I steal a lot of cadences from Buddy all the time. We take from each other constantly.

You have a ton of co-signs in the game. How do you view your stance in rap?

I think I’m at least top five right now [out] of all the new n*ggas. It’s not nobody really super out-rapping me, who’s making major waves. It’s definitely n*ggas who could out-bar me. But, they’re nobody. In terms of the new wave? I’m definitely at least top 10. If the XXL list wasn’t just off super clout merit, then I’d probably be topping that. That’s how I feel.

You say top five. Who are the other four?

All my patnas: Smino, Buddy, J.I.D. Man, there’s so many different lanes. I really love Gashi. I’m a fan of Zoey Dollaz, he’s super underdog and super talented. Arin Ray is tight, he’s a singer. SiR, I’m friends with so many super tight n*ggas. Kent is crazy, I’ve been just studying him. BJ the Chicago Kid, all my patnas are tight. Jigga Juice is one of my favorite rappers. There’s talent everywhere. I’m just saying out of all the talent, I’m up there.

Talk about linking with Mozzy on ‘Scammin.’ That was a summer bop.

I wasn’t even in the studio when Mozzy cut the verse, but I’m always around Mozzy when he comes to record in L.A. He records here. His manager DaveO and my manager Sam Lancaster are super tight. So, it was nothing to put that together. Mozzy’s a super talented dude, he really embodies the Northern California steelo of just being an advanced linguist. Somebody who’s super innovative when it comes to language and the building blocks that is colloquialism.

Let’s talk about ‘Gucci Pajamas’ being a real thing.

‘Gucci Pajamas’ is fucking tight, man. I’m happy that people are receiving it the way we wanted them to. The roll out was wild, it’s a real story.

Bring us back to when you decided to make this into a record.

I already had the concept for awhile, it was just about putting it together to go off the energy of me exposing what happened because a lot of people don’t know, I’m cool. I ain’t paying for clothes and I ain’t paying for pussy. I don’t fuck with no broke hoes either. I was just being petty posting the screenshots because I wanted my pajamas. But, at the same time, it don’t matter. I’m still cool with the girls. We gon’ fuck one more time before I fully just stop doing it.

How did you get Chance and Charlie Wilson on board?

I tweeted Chance a long time ago. If you Google our tweet history, you’ll be able to find the tweets. I’m just like, ‘Yo Chance, I’m trying to scam you for some music.’ He’s like, ‘C’mon.’ I’m like, ‘Bet, I’m finna DM you.’ Then, I DM’d him and he’s telling me when he was about to be where I was about to be. We got together. He actually paid for the studio time.

How’d you get the Charlie Wilson vocals though?

The Stereotypes put that together. I literally had Chance’s verse on the record and I had rewrote my verse with Jozzy, who came in and helped me. It was out here in L.A. She’s super talented. Actually, my manager recommended it. He’s like, ‘Maybe we need to be a little more hit record-y, so let’s bring in a hitmaker.’ We brought in Jozzy and we wrote that verse together. It came out as smooth as it is now. I was literally talking to The Stereotypes like, ‘Man, some Charlie Wilson ad libs would be crazy.’ Ray Romulus (from the Stereotypes) was like, ‘Yeah, no that would be crazy! Charlie Wilson what? I could do that.’ That n*gga put it together so fast, we had a session and Charlie pulled up. We became best friends.

What can we expect from Dior Deposits on October 25?

Good music. You can expect a variety of sounds. If this was early 2000s, it would’ve been the hottest mixtape of the year. It’s just so good. I really express myself on some of the songs, I get super musical on some of the songs, I get super Bay area on some of the songs. It’s really a representation of me.

Do you like being independent?

I like where I’m at right now. I’m happy. I’m content. It’s me. It’s a check. TWNSHP, that’s the label. I feel good here and I’m growing here.

How much is a Guapdad feature?

A Guapdad feature is whatever budget that n*ggas think I’m worth. So, basically $50,000, $60,000. I’m just playing. I don’t even really do features like that. If I really need to pay for something, [it’s] ‘cause I’m independent. If I’m trying to come up with a budget we don’t have funding for, I’ll do features. I’ll open that door up. I don’t have a set number right now just because the brand’s so volatile. I don’t even want to say what it is.

What are some goals for yourself as an artist at this point of your career?

I need Snoop Dogg to call me nephew, it’s coming though. I already got Uncle Charlie. I’m just crossing all my uncles off. DJ Enuff, that’s Uncle E now. I’m just adding to the uncle list getting ready for the big cookout, baby. I want to design my own doll, so people can have Guapdad action figures. That’d be hella clean to have on the desk, put it in your home. Musical goals? I still want to get in with Pharrell. Do that. I want to make a song with Frank Ocean, Young Thug, and Swae Lee, all those people are on my dream to work with list.

If you love Cali stars and hip hop, you’ll definitely want to join us and AT&T in L.A. on Oct. 25 - Oct. 27 for our three-day REVOLT Summit, which was created to help rising moguls reach the next level. Head to REVOLTSummit.com for more info and get your passes here!

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