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Lil Durk talks new music with Lil Reese, the Drill movement five years later

He also unveils what his dream team Chicago posse-cut would look like.

Five years ago, Drill music made its mainstream debut. It introduced the world outside of Chicago’s Southside to the Windy City’s then-budding music scene, as well as a bevy of promising young artists. Fast forward half of a decade and a lot has changed. Despite the careers of many of those early promising Chi-Town rap upstarts losing traction over the years, Lil Durk has seemingly made it his mission to never stop grinding. He recently released the single (along with its video) “Goofy” featuring Future and Jeezy. The Southside-produced track, which serves as a teaser to Durk’s forthcoming third installment of his Signed to the Streets mixtape series happens to be one of the several collabs the “Dis Ain't What U Want” rapper has unleashed during Summer ‘17. He and his Chicago brother Lil Reese connected for the Supa Vultures EP, dropping multiple records like “Distance.” “I’d be working with him and if he’d fall asleep or something I’d still be recording,” said the rapper with workaholic tendencies, who admits that he locks-in in the studio on a daily basis.

In an interview with REVOLT, Lil Durk spoke about his new music, what his dream team Chicago posse-cut would look like and his thoughts on the Drill movement five years later.

Signed to the Streets’ first single is the Jeezy and Future-featured "Goofy." How did that collaboration come together?

Lil Durk: Those are my brothers. I had a vision and an idea for it and just brought it together.

What can we expect from Signed to the Streets?

Lil Durk: It’s a mix of old and new energy. I’m giving the fans what they’ve been wanting and putting out great music. It’s the old and the new, but a different vibe. I’m back in with the Young Chops and the producers I been working with. That’s what everybody wants to hear.

Speaking on somebody you’ve been working with- what made you and Lil Reese come together for the collaborative EP Supa Vultures?

Lil Durk: Everybody’s been wanting this for the longest. That's my brother. I had him come to Atlanta and we just locked in. Out of the 10 to 15 songs we recorded, we just chose the best five songs.

How was it touring with Jeezy for the Trap Or Die 3 Tour?

Lil Durk: It was good. Being around Jeezy, seeing what I have to work on and being able to check myself - just the experience itself was great for the resume. Every city was turnt up and every city showed love. That was the best thing about it. It was nothing dry.

Has your recent move to Atlanta had any impact on your music?

Lil Durk: Yeah, it’s a new energy and vibe down there. Moving around and stuff makes a difference because you're around new energy and new artists. Artists you've never been around. Artists you've never worked with. And now when y'all go in the studio the vibes is there.

It’s been five years since Drill music and the Drill movement hit the mainstream?

Lil Durk: As long as there is something to talk about and it relates to the streets and what’s going on, it’ll never die. If you can keep up with it and you got stuff to talk about, it’s nothing wrong with it or any other type of music.

Looking back, is there anything you’d change regarding how Drill music and its movement was introduced or viewed in the beginning of it going nationwide?

Lil Durk: I wouldn’t change nothing.

If you could put together a posse cut with only Chicago rappers, what would be your dream team lineup?

Lil Durk: LA Capone RondoNumbaNine, Nuski, Bump J, Kanye West and Lil Lester.

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